Welcome to Czech Absinthe – or is that Absinth?

Strong Absinthe

Absinthe from the Czech Republic is locally termed absinth and is renowned by party goers for that extra-powerful thujone kick.

What is thujone? Actually, thujone is a constituent of the herb wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) which – along with other herbs – causes the green colour of this famous drink. Czech thujone-rich absinth has developed a cult following all of its own and even a unique method of drinking. The so-called “Czech method” involves the following steps:

1. Place absinthe spoon over a glass containing water

2. Place sugar cube on spoon

3. Pour absinthe

4. Set fire to the absinthe-soaked cube and let the caramelised sugar drip into glass

This method was first observed by Western visitors to Prague in the early 1990s; the method has an uncertain provenance. (More on the Czech method and its origins will appear in a later post.) It may have been an eccentric Icelandic pop star who started this in the 90s, or it may date to another period altogether.

However, it would be fair to mention that this method has caused some upset amongst the self-proclaimed “online absinthe community” which decries the practice as “non-authentic”. The only real way to drink absinthe is the 19th century way, by adding chilled water, according to them. Isn’t this the 21st century? The Czechs are an independent lot these days and they’ll do as they please. It has actually been suggested that the Czech method was devised by the laissez faire, post-Communist Czechs as a means of intensifying the effect of the wormwood thujone by burning off some of the alcohol. Czech absinthe is already the market leader as far as thujone is concerned, so this theory may be true.

Controversy aside, the world of Czech absinthe is a fascinating one. Wander through the streets of the beautiful capital Prague and you will find absinth, and even absinthe, in many shop windows. Shops also sell absinthe paraphernalia like spoons, glasses and absinthe fountains. It is easy to buy absinthe in Prague! A recent newcomer to the scene is Toulouse Lautrec Absinthe, a brand made by the Czech distiller Cami and named after the famous belle epoque artist. Tolouse Lautrec is similar in style to the absinthes enjoyed at the turn of the 19th century. So for those that like to live in the past, the Czechs have that too. The feisty thujone-rich brews of modern Bohemia are my favourite and so I’ll be pouring a glass to celebrate the end of another week.

Czech word or phrase of the day: Na zdravi means cheers!

Absinthe quote :“Absinthe has a wonderful color, green. A glass of absinthe is as poetical as anything in the world. What difference is there between a glass of absinthe and a sunset?” Oscar Wilde

111 responses to “Welcome to Czech Absinthe – or is that Absinth?

  1. As requested, I’m not sure I can say it any better than this:

    My problems with Czech “absinth:”

    1. The Taste: what other type of drink needs to disguise its taste by burning? If these drinks tasted OK, you might be able to recommend another major way of drinking it.

    2. Thujone marketing hype: I’m sorry but I really do feel that this is bankrupt marketing, and, in many cases, it is completely misleading. How many Czech absinths (and it is mainly Czech absinths) with less than 35 ppm or even less than 10 go on about the thujone level, as if at that level it made any difference. Yes, I do want absinthe legalised in the USA, but it seems that makers of Czech absinth don’t. This communication certainly doesn’t help the cause. Why don’t you want US legalisation?

    3. “Panty remover” advertising hype. Absolutely disgraceful advertising. Degrading to women; insulting to anyone with a bit of intelligence. It may have nothing to do with your company, but why allow it to happen? Bad for the whole category.

    4. The overall price/quality ratio (the staggeringly expensive “absinths” such as KOS/KOS Gold). You have seen the thread at Fee Verte which I didn’t join in.

    And how come Oliva can state that Czech absinth is so bad?

    Why don’t we continue this discussion in private and by email: I’m alan@absinthe-suisse.com

  2. In private? Why? I’ll answer you in public:

    1. Personal opinion and not objective fact. Many people enjoy the edgy thujone rich brews from the Czech Republic. The production methods – oil mix – macerating the herbs means the herbal bouquet is much stronger. It is also possible that this modern filtration method is the reason for the intensity of the thujone.

    Your personal taste is not relevant, but thank you for sharing this. We now know that you don’t like the taste. Marvellous🙂

    2. I do not want US legalisation? I hadn’t really ever thought about it! It bothers you because you are a businessman. Thujone level testing is quite difficult – did you see the German study? Note the figures for Bairnsfather absinth and KOS Gold.

    3. Personal predjudice. Who are you? some self appointed guardian of morality? Czechs do not have a problem with sex, and this campaign obviously plays on absinthe’s reputation as an aphrodisiac. What about it? Unless you see yourself as a advertising regulator – or Mary Whitehouse style campaigner – you should occupy youirself with other issues.!

    Hint: Selling La Clandestine’s positive aspects as opposed to denegrating others perhaps?

    4. Business talk again. Is anyone selling anything here? Answer: No. Ask the seller. If you want to talk business you are in the wrong place. Your job is to sell a particular brand of Swiss absinthe – you used to sell Czech absinth – I don’t know what all this is about with you, but I am wondering if you have some “issues” from your business affairs that cause these outbursts?

  3. I have said it before, but let’s try one more time. The drinks this blog is about are NOT absinthe. I dislike this misrepresentation and it seems I am not alone in that.
    If Czech companies called them “wormwood bitters,” or something similar, no-one in the Wormwood Society or in the real absinthe community would mind and we’d all ignore you, and the various Czechsinth blogs and marketing.
    That’s the heart of the matter.

    Mod: Feel free to ignore us. We don’t knock the Swiss absinthe that you sell – please leave us in peace. The “Wormwood Society” is not a recognised body, it is merely a grandly named hobby site like this blog.

  4. B. - Formerly anonymous

    I’ve met many people who were originally brought into the world of the Fee Verte by the Czech brands hyping secondary effects and bright green artificial coloring.

    EVERY ONE OF THEM were surprised when I poured them a glass of real absinthe (i.e. produced according to the distillation manuals), and they were able to drink it without flame, and without shooting it down.

    Czech absinth preys on the uneducated masses, which is one reason I disregard it as an imitation.

    As for Drabsinthe’s comments on the other board: “You KNOW what pre ban absinthe tasted like? Is your real name Dr Who?

    You KNOW what it tastes like today if you are lucky enough to be find any. Unless your online community has now invented a time machine, as well as reinventing reality in it’s own image, then I must beg to differ. Absinthe undergoes a transformation in colour during the passage of time – the colour changes to an amber brown – the taste also changes I imagine. The thujone levels might similarly be affected, and this leaves open to question the veracity of those pre ban thujone tests conducted recently.”

    If a modern distiller uses the same recipe taken from the pre-ban’s manual and follows the same process witht he same exact ingredients, wouldn’t you expect that the new product would taste similar to the pre-ban? It would also go to figure that the resulting thujone levels in the new absinthe would be similar to those of the pre-ban (upon its original distillation without aging, of course).

    Thoughts?

  5. Greetings friends! does anyone here speak French?

    Si je n’avais trouvé notre petit Livry tout à propos, j’aurais été malade. J’avalai là tout doucement mon absinthe ; M. de Pomponne et sa famille, et Mme de Vins, font tout de même.

    Dated 1679

    When did the Henroid sisters write down their absinthe formula? Does it still exist?

  6. Interesting, but please explain how your question is relevant.

    Absintheur and drabsinthe persist in not anwering the questions about Czech drinks that claim to be absinth(e). I guess you do so in order to wear us down since there seems little intention (if any) on your part to engage in debate. Or “debacle” as drabsinthe calls it which is defined as:

    1. A sudden, disastrous collapse, downfall, or defeat; a rout.
    2. A total, often ludicrous failure.

    I thought the subject was “Welcome to Czech Absinthe – or is that Absinth?” So let me repeat the questions again:

    1. Are the products you mention (on the Live Journal blog) real absinthe as laid down in the historic Duplais papers? Yes or No?

    2. Can you persuade the Czechsinth vendors to adopt honest and moral marketing practices? No references to REAL absinthe, no thujone hyping. Yes or No?

    3. This is not racist UNLESS you are saying that only Czechsinths are marketed in this dishonest way. Are you saying that? Yes or No?

  7. 1. Anwer the question first. What do you mean by “laid down”?

    The other points have been answered. Why are you repeating this mantra ad nauseam? Anonymous’ point about the levels of thujone in distilled vs oil mix absinthe is interesting – moralising and bombast may be your hobby but it isn’t appropriate here.

  8. By the way, Alan why are you provoking others into attacking me on other communities?

  9. Duplais P. Traité des liqueurs et de la distillation des alcools ou le liquoriste et le distillateur moderns. Versailles: Chez l’Auteur, 1855.

    Is that what Alan means? Thank you for sourcing that picture of Hillary at Cafe Slavia!

  10. B. - Formerly anonymous

    I don’t consider Alan’s announcement about someone who is trying to make false claims about thujone and Czech abinthe a provocation to attack.

    I would consier it more of a call to bring out the truth.

  11. I’m not a technical person, so I’m not going to answer technical questions. Go ask your friends in the Czechsinth industry.

    I don’t recall seeing your answers to questions 1- 3 above.

    I’m not provoking others into attacking you. I have asked people to join the debate with you. It seems to me that you are not interested in a debate on the core issue. “Czech Absinthe – or is that Absinth?” No, it should really be something like “wormwood bitters” since there is very little which links most of the products on this site with real absinthe.

  12. B. - Formerly anonymous

    Agreed. I enjoy civilized debate. However, anyone who needlessly pulls the racism card has probably lost my respect as a ‘civilized’ debator.

    However, I’m still willing to listen, and provide points and counterpoints.

    It’s not that Czech abinth doesn’t deserve a place in the liquor market. It just doesn’t deserve the classification as an Absinthe. When you change fundamental ingredients in a recipe, it ceases being that original product. It’s like saying that whiskey and tequila are the same thing.

  13. **a glass of real absinthe (i.e. produced according to the distillation manuals)

    So you consider Cami Tolouse Lautrec absinthe to be real absinthe or not?

    **Czech absinth preys on the uneducated masses, which is one reason I disregard it as an imitation.

    Your prerogative, matey. Can you let others enjoy the high alcohol, high thujone and powerful herbal taste of Czech absinth? It’s a question of personal tatse and not objective fact.

    As for Drabsinthe’s comments on the other board: “You KNOW what pre ban absinthe tasted like? Is your real name Dr Who?

    **If a modern distiller uses the same recipe taken from the pre-ban’s manual and follows the same process witht he same exact ingredients, wouldn’t you expect that the new product would taste similar to the pre-ban?

    I don’t know. I do know that absinthe can vary wildly depending on the batch and the skills of the producer. It is therefore not possible to say. Look at the efforts that Kyle Bairnsfather has gone to, using modern day technology, producing his new range.

    **It would also go to figure that the resulting thujone levels in the new absinthe would be similar to those of the pre-ban (upon its original distillation without aging, of course).

    Not necessarily because of the batch issue mentioned above. One brand – no names – with a thujone level of less than 35mg produced a batch at 100mg by error. I do not know about TB’s background – has he been in the drinks industry for a long while? There is certainly a lot of hype surrounding his products launch on the TV and so on.

    What do you think about thujone levels in distilled vs oil mix? I find this a very interesting idea

  14. The racism issue refers to the poisonous remarks on some communities which use stereotypes about Eastern Europeans. They are deeply ignorant – they are a minority but a vociferous one – and should not be tolerated.

  15. **I’m not a technical person, so I’m not going to answer technical questions. Go ask your friends in the Czechsinth industry

    What is your point about Duplais? Is that a technical question?

  16. I agree 100% your comment that racism should not be tolerated.

  17. Is it only available in French? I assume that Alan speaks French or Swiss French.

    please avoid ad hominem arguments

  18. B. - Formerly anonymous

    Regarding rascism, you’re full of it. There are plenty of people who live in Eastern Europe that are also members of those forums.

    Regarding high thujone: What’s your point? What do YOU say a high thujone level does? I can tell you, I’ve drank bottles of Czechsinthe in a sitting, and haven’t had any other ‘effect’ other than drunkenness.

    Regarding TB, he uses ORIGINAL alembics built in the 1870s from the Pernod distillery in Pontarlier , and ORIGINAL recipes. I would think that would mean the product would come as close as possible to the orginal. Have you visited the distillery?

    He’s also a chemist, so I’m sure his analysis of the degredation of the constituents in the pre-ban samples is fairly accurate, including the effects of fuille morte and thujone levels.

    Also, I never saw a response from you to the post I made before regarding the study you mentioned in the past forum. I’m anxious to see your response to the full study.

  19. “I can tell you”

    Can you? If you drink several bottles of high proof alcohol at a sitting then you will get very inebriated. You’ll blot out any secondary effects. You should not drink that much.

    “he uses ORIGINAL alembics built in the 1870s”

    Good copy, but I say again it depends on the individual. Dismissing the advantages of modernity, in the name of tradition, may sound attractive and it also might be very succesful. You should keep an open mind – read the thread on Fee Verte were Kyle B tries to discuss this before the debate spirals into the bear garden. Not pivo🙂 Which reminds me it’s nearly time!

    The neurons article from Harvard, is that?

  20. No more discussion of racism please

  21. B. - Formerly anonymous

    I’ve also drank levels anywhere from 1 sip all the way up to a bottle. So again, tell me, to what effects do you speak? How much and which brand should I drink to get said effects? Whatever brand you mention, I probably have a bottle, so I’ll do the experiment as soon as I hear back from you.

    Good copy? They are the ORIGINAL! They are the same stills that produced some of the same prebans that were tested.

    The study to which I refer is the one that was the source for the article you linked in the previous thread. I gave you the link to the full study. It shows that the levels of thujone that were used on mice in the study were levels that could never be consumed by a human. Said human would die from alcohol poisoning well before he would ingest enough thujone to do anything, even with the high thujone Czechsinthes.

    Speaking of high thujone, brands such as KOSG that have chunks of wormwood in the bottle aren’t advertising truthfully, because the include the chunks in that measure. No one would ever reasonably expect to ingest the actual pieces of wormwood.

    Also, take a look at Absintheur’s list of absinth from the bar he went to in Prague “Absinthe Time” I think it’s called. Of all of the absinthe on the menu, only 5 of the 19 have more than 10 mg/l of thujone. Does that mean that your assertion that you prefer Czech brands because of their high thujone is false?

  22. “Good copy? They are the ORIGINAL!”

    I am sure they are! That was not the point. I would love to see them, do they do tours?

    KOSG is the bette noire, isn’t it? It is what gets Alan so cross! But he likes Czech beer so he must be a nice fellow. KOS and KOSG are the issue here, right? Why shouldn’t La Fee be allowed to produce a Bohemian Absinth? Alan suggested this earlier. What is it like, anyone?

    Re Absinthe Time Bar list: I didn’t say I liked all Czech absinth, did I? There is one brand – a newbie – that I can’t fathom. I have also explained my extreme disapointment with a few French absinthes that tasted like olive liquer and didn’t louche. You know the ones I mean I am sure.

    Don’t you like Bairnsfather? What don’t you like?

    I’ll re read that Harvard paper tonight, thanks.

  23. B. - Formerly anonymous

    “olive liquer and didn’t louche.” – I have NEVER run across what purports to be an Absinthe, but tastes like Olives. ; )

    KOSG and KOS are not the issue. The issue is Czech brands marketing themselves as Absinthe, and hyping thujone.

    There are French oil mixes, but they also are not considered quality Absinthe.

    TB’s distillery is open for visits. Feel free to stop by.

    I’m still waiting on your recommendations for which absinth to drink, and how much, in order to get the ‘effects’. With bated breath, I might add.

  24. B. - Formerly anonymous

    P.S. – You shouldn’t have to reread a study that you used as your source. You should have known what it said BEFORE you used it as your point-maker for the deliterious effects of thujone.

  25. (Ad hominem. Mod)

    Seriously, I’ll re read it with your comments in mind and then make my own mind up.

    Thank you for the invite! You work for Jade?

    French oil mixes are “not considered quality Absinthe” but they are absinthe, are they? Just like Doubs – a South African oil mix! The Czech oil mixes aren’t though? Bit odd? What about Absinthiun 1792 – anise? That isn’t accepted either? If it’s Czech it’s out, seems to be your dictat. Some of your community have given a grudging acceptance to Toulouse Lautrec absinthe – that was produced in the Czech Republic in association with a German, I believe? Doesn’t Havel’s Alpine Absinth qualify?
    If you have an issue with a particular brand, why don’t you say so, as opposed to pouring scorn on Czech absinth as a category?

    Answer my question about what you think about Bairnsfather absinth. What are the effects? Do you find a kind of clear headed sensation? I don’t “reccomend” brands I’ll leave that to the commercial operators.

    It would be nice to continue our chat over a beer, but given your stated habit of downing bottles of high proof alcohol at one sitting, I wonder if that is such a good idea🙂 Have a glass of Bairnsfather absinth and we’ll talk further tommorow, perhaps?

  26. B. - Formerly anonymous

    No, I don’t work for Jade. I’m just an Absintheur.

    I’ve never said, if it’s Czech, it’s out. My point was already made in previous posts, regarding qualifications for what a true absinthe is. It involves specific ingredients and procedures. I don’t need to explain it again.

    Are you referring to Bairnsfather Absinthe, or Bitter? I’ve had them both, and haven’t seen the ‘effects’. The Absinth isn’t ‘sinkable’ like many other brands I’ve had, but its lack of flavor, complexity, and mouthfeel make it something that I’d never reach for. There’s so many better tasting absinthes out there

    I also never make it a habit of downing bottles of liquor. All I said was that I’ve done it. It’s not a regular thing. In fact, I tend to have no more than 1 or 2 drinks a week, at best.

    If you don’t recommend brands, why in some sentences to you say ‘no names’, and then in others, you mention specific brands?

    I’d be more than happy to continue our conversation in person. However, let me offer this: instead od discussing over a beer, how about we line up a bunch of Absinthes and Absinths and have a tasting. I’ve got more than enough of both to make it a fair comparison.

    If you’re lucky enough, I may even go into my special drawer, and get out some of the 12 or so pre-bans, and we’ll make a go of those, so you can have an educated opinion on what REAL absinthe was during its heyday.

    I’ll write more when I get back from my meetings.

  27. absintheur: “please avoid ad hominem arguments.”

    drabinthe: “:-) You are also a master at M. Alan’s Reformatory School for Victorian Gentlemen?”

  28. Tbanks! I hope that some of the more mouthy, dysfunctional members of WS join this debate. That community is now gated, is it? Cordon sanitaire, perhaps? Which one are you by the way, Sir?

    Mod: Last remark removed.

  29. No offence intended, Alan.

    Mod: Last warning

  30. Last warning Dr.A. Thank you kindly

  31. Is there a problem with making a long post here? Two of us have had problems posting. Is there a maximum size?

  32. Sorry, no idea. Perhaps try sections 1 & 2?

  33. If I may be allowed to join the conversation I’d be quite interested to know from where the Czech manufactures source their herbal ingredients. Herbal quality can make a substantial impact on taste. Some have averred that the wormwood grown in the Department of Doubs, France and the pays de Neuchatel, Switzerland are unparalleled for their taste. I hope I got that right, I don’t claim any expertise. There are pertinent questions about how oils are manufactured for inclusion in oil mixed absinthes as well. But may next post. If you guys will let me join in.

  34. DrAbsinthe stated: “Re Absinthe Time Bar list: I didn’t say I liked all Czech absinth, did I? There is one brand – a newbie – that I can’t fathom. I have also explained my extreme disapointment with a few French absinthes that tasted like olive liquer and didn’t louche. You know the ones I mean I am sure.”

    It would be good to know what brands you are referring to. Both the unfathomable Czech brand and the French absinthes.

  35. DrAbsinthe stated: “Doesn’t Havel’s Alpine Absinth qualify?”

    It was my impression reading what Kyle stated on Fee Verte some while ago that this product is no longer made. Difficult for us to assess a product that doesn’t exist.

  36. “What about Absinthiun 1792 – anise?”

    Yes, but doesn’t it also include sugar? Wouldn’t that make it a liqueur, technically, rather than absinthe?

    And Alan, I do believe you’re correct about the Havel’s being discontinued.

  37. I will reply to this post in a second. First, I can’t seem to post a comment on the wordpress page. I wrote a really long reply. Can you post it for me?

    I just want to point out that the spelling of absinthe is not important. It is how it is made (herbs and process) that makes it absinthe. We call our brand Oliva Absinth because it is Czech. We use a Suisse recipe and process because that is the best way to make absinthe. Why other Czech companies choose to make it blue, and with a different process, I have no idea. There is nothing stopping any and all of them from making it the right way.

    There are some pretty crappy vodkas that have great marketing. While I am disappointed with the choices that Czech producers are making, I ultimately feel it helps absinthe as a whole. And here is why:

    The mega marketing gets people to even know that absinthe exists. It is a gateway to the better products. Even the fire ritual serves this purpose.

    People get interested in it for different reasons, then they try to find more information about it. Then they learn that there is even better products available for the same or cheaper price. People do not go back to crappy products, only to good ones. I would even go as far as to say that we would not even be talking about absinthe right now if it were not for the ridiculous fire ritual and blue Czech absinthe.

  38. One thing to note is that I have read many pre-ban articles about absinthe that talked about bootleg or fake absinthe being made and sold. Almost all of them stated that even though people knew it was fake (based on the low price I assume), they actually preferred the taste, or said it was as good at the real thing.

    So, process is important. If it walks like a duck, looks like a duck, and tastes like a duck, it may not be a duck. What I mean is that even if people like Barnesfather come up with some new way to make a green alcohol that tastes and looks like absinthe, that doesn’t mean it is absinthe.

  39. I hope that Czech absinthe makers continue to spend lots of money on marketing to introduce people to absinthe. I also hope that people stop to make blanket statements that say that ALL Czech absinthe is crap, or if it is spelled without the “e” don’t bother.

    This is the vow #11 of our Royal Bohemian Association:

    I am just kind of not focused in this posting due to time constraints. I hope this is coherent enough to get my point across (do I have one?).

  40. Ok, it seems that long links are not allowed to be posted here. For the link to the Royal Bohemian try this:
    http://www.olivaabsinth.com/ royal-bohemian-association-buy-absinthe-pg-16.html

  41. Elliot Novak, why is that when I click on your name I am taken to the AbsintheOriginal site which sells brands that I think you prefer not to put in the same category with Oliva Absinthe? And no Oliva Absinthe in sight/site? Rather curious problem for me.

  42. “Why other Czech companies choose to make it blue, and with a different process, I have no idea.”

    Cost and profitability? I won’t divulge confidential information, but I have an informed view that Czechsinth is much cheaper to make. Maybe Elliot could be more specific: how much more does it cost them to produce a high quality absinthe?

  43. The posted link also wants to take me AbsintheOriginal, but the transfer isn’t being completed. I get an error message now. Albeit I do see the Oliva page if a merely put my pointer on the link and let it bring-up the mini-window. Which is, of course, too small to do any good.

  44. Since this blog is actually about absinth and Drabsinthe refuses to come and debate on other forums, a reply,

    Drabsinthe said, “Many people enjoy the edgy thujone rich brews from the Czech Republic.”
    But why do they enjoy them? Flavor? Alcohol content? Because they think they will trip? Can they taste or feel the thujone? If not, what’s the point of listing it?

    Drabsinthe said, “So you consider Cami Tolouse Lautrec absinthe to be real absinthe or not?”
    I Do. The czech can make good absinthe if they tried but many products labeled “Czech absinth” are not absinthe.

    Drabsinthe said, “Can you let others enjoy the high alcohol, high thujone and powerful herbal taste of Czech absinth?”
    Sure I can, as long as those people know the high thujone means nothing and it’s not really absinthe. I have wondered what’s so wrong with the Czech companies taking pride and saying “We created this drink, it’s meant to be an herbal bitters, now drink you lazy bastards”? Why do so many claim their product is absinthe and falsely attach it to the product sold in France and Switzerland (among other places) in the 19th century? If the product can stand on it’s own feet like you say, why aren’t companies allowing it to?

    Drabsinthe said,”One brand – no names – with a thujone level of less than 35mg produced a batch at 100mg by error.”
    Source please.

    -Ari

  45. “I won’t divulge confidential information, but I have an informed view that Czechsinth is much cheaper to make. Maybe Elliot could be more specific: how much more does it cost them to produce a high quality absinthe?”

    Well, I am sure you are being facetious asking me to disclose my costs, especially publicly. I would guess that it is more expensive than a product like Fruko Schulz or something. It is also more work than a simple maceration. However, at the prices they are getting due to marketing, etc, it wouldn’t matter that much. Maybe I am wrong. I didn’t price out how much the cost is to make it that way.

  46. Elliot, please, can you explain why I can’t get access to the Oliva Absinthe site? And why I am being directed to the Original site instead? It is very disconcerting.

  47. “Elliot Novak, why is that when I click on your name I am taken to the AbsintheOriginal site which sells brands that I think you prefer not to put in the same category with Oliva Absinthe? And no Oliva Absinthe in sight/site? Rather curious problem for me.”

    We have a couple reasons to redirect access from Germany in particular (though we do this by IP range, so there may be some bleed over to other countries). We chose that site at random. It will be a different site soon, and change every 1-2 months. I can make it your absinthe site if you want.

    I know it’s annoying, but we want to give Oliva Absinth some time to get established online before opening up access to Germany.

  48. Are you making it available at all on the domestic market in the Czech Republic, then?

  49. Likely not, or at least not for a long time. Czechs don’t really care about absinthe. Beer is their drink. While you can buy Fruko and Trul “absinthe” in grocery stores, it is hard to find, and sells in tourist places. Most bars carry Hills only. If the Czech appreciation for absinthe increases, then we will distribute in Czech. But there isn’t really a point now without losing profitability. We are thinking about maybe selling in one or two specialty shops in tourist areas, if at all.

  50. Let me see if I’ve got this right, then. You’re blocking a significant part of the European market from even accessing your site. You have little intention of selling to your domestic market, although you are willing to disparage the competitors that are manufactured there. While domestic consumers are not given a better alternative to possibly build yourself a more discerning market there. Truthfully, this sounds a bit like the other Czech brands in terms of getting into the absinthe niche for the money only. Are you sure you haven’t set up your manufacturing base in the Czech Republic because overhead costs are lower? (Yes, Novak is a good Czech name. Elliot isn’t though.) I hope your product has the quality to compete and maybe change some perceptions. Not that I’ll be allowed to know the quality of your product anytime soon.

  51. Welcome Tewl, Ari, Elliot! Please invite Pavel Varga and Kyle to join the party🙂 I would pour myself an Olivia if I had one🙂 I’ll make do with a Pilsner Urquell tonight. Na zdravi!

  52. “Truthfully, this sounds a bit like the other Czech brands in terms of getting into the absinthe niche for the money only. Are you sure you haven’t set up your manufacturing base in the Czech Republic because overhead costs are lower? (Yes, Novak is a good Czech name. Elliot isn’t though.) I hope your product has the quality to compete and maybe change some perceptions. Not that I’ll be allowed to know the quality of your product anytime soon.”

    I am sorry my business practice does not meet your expectations. I wish I could open the website up to Germany right now, and if you send me an email I can tell you more privately. We are not blocking sales or exports to Germany. Just access to the website.

    I don’t know why the domestic market has anything to do with anything. There is no money in it. We are also not going to export to Cambodia, most likely. Probably not even Burma. We cannot compete domestically. We are not going to take a loss in a long shot attempt to raise the palate of the Czech population.

  53. B. - Formerly anonymous

    I’m always willing to try a new absinthe/absinth. If Olivia is one that will stand up to an absintheur’s standards, I’d gladly take a sample, and post a review.

    If I end up liking it, I’ll even buy a bottle.🙂

  54. Elliot is correct about it being difficult to get certain brands in Prague. Anyone know if it is true that Jade is sold in a disco called Roxy?

  55. “There is no money in it. We are also not going to export to Cambodia, most likely. Probably not even Burma. We cannot compete domestically. We are not going to take a loss in a long shot attempt to raise the palate of the Czech population.”

    Yes, I understand the problem at selling more expensive absinthe in the Czech Republic. I tried!

  56. I hope I am not going to be accused of an “ad hominem” comment but is Elliot anything to do with:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elliot_Novak

    Cheap joke, sorry. Wikipedia me and I’m a famous cricketer.

  57. Mod: Yellow card! One more and it is over

    Jade is available at Roxy Bar Prague, Dlouha 33, 0 00 Praha 1 according to LDF. Did you ever hear of Google?

    BTW Alan, why should La Fee not market a Bohemian absinth? I will answer Ari and the other WS “Green Shirts” in due course.

  58. “BTW Alan, why should La Fee not market a Bohemian absinth?” I don’t know. What’s the punchline?

  59. 😆 I am enjoying the jokes. What are you drinking? La Clandestine? http://www.absinthe-suisse.com/

  60. “Claude-Alain’s La Clandestine absinthe is one of a carefully selected range of fine Swiss absinthes (and an even smaller range of French absinthes) now available through his new internet boutique

    His Recette Marianne, launched primarily for the French market, has twice won the Golden Spoon at the Pontarlier Absinthiades which are, according to some, absinthe’s Oscars”

    My birthday is coming up😀 Absinthe Oscars!

  61. If only… I’ve a bad cold and it’s some hot flu drink right now. Maybe La Clandestine would work better.

  62. I suggest Beechams powders and a good nights rest, take some Vitamin C and no stress. Update us in the morning.

    Did Claude Alain use to create his magic in the kitchen / laundry of his home. I think you wrote that somewhere and that his wife wasn’t too pleased. Does he now have somewhere else? If this is ad homiwhatever then my name is Mary Poppins.

  63. We could all meet up over a bottle of pre-ban absinthe and have a “debate” – I bet Alan’s got one – perhaps Hiram and Ari might join us. Hair raising thought🙂

  64. Mary: the story of La Clandestine is irrelevant to these discussions. In the same light that you told our host to use google, I’d suggest you use the internet to find answers to your questions.

    Actually I prefer you as Mary. drab sinthe did not seem too complimentary.

  65. General debate note: “ad hominem” is one of a number of logical fallacies. In simplest terms it means attacking the person not their argument. As a logical fallacy it’s attacking the person to refute their claim.

  66. Drab Sinthe🙂 that will stick!

    Alan, I know that you are an absinthe expert and greatly appreciate your contributions. If you would like to invite Wormwood Society members, Pavel Varga, Kyle Barnsfather, or any other valuable contributers here, then feel free! Fee Verte (is it Oxy?) is also most welcome. I enjoy a civilised debate….perhaps we can even reach a consensus? I might also make new friends🙂

  67. B. - Formerly anonymous

    “We could all meet up over a bottle of pre-ban absinthe and have a “debate” ” I’ve got more than enough to go around. As long as it would be appreciated, of course, and not lit aflame to ‘reduce the alcohol to get to the more potent thujone’. 😉

  68. Thank you ! I don’t know Pavel or Kyle but I have already mentioned this discussion to the others.

  69. B. - Formerly anonymous

    Absintheur, you’re also very welcome to join up at the Wormwood Society. You’ll find them to be a less rambunctious bunch than Louched Lounge or Fee Verte. Oxy, TB, and many others frequent all of those sites, so I’m sure you’ll get some good discussion. Just keep it civil, and they’ll do the same. The moment you (see:Drabsinthe) start attacking or calling names (‘Dr. Who’, etc), they’ll pounce.

    However, if you really want to just have a spirited, good natured debate, state as such, and they’ll be glad to oblige (at least at the WS).

    The one thread that Drabsinthe used to call the WS members hateful and rude has some history. The person who started that thread was an obnoxious son of a ‘something’, way before he started that thread, and did so just to stir the pot.

  70. Thank you very much, Alan! and thank you B. ! I would really like the discussion to include the Czech manufacturers and I’m not sure of their emails. If anyone can help ….there is a Czech on WS… then that would be great. I am not going to turn down the chance of sip of pre-ban either🙂

  71. Censorship is the removal or withholding of information from the public by a controlling GROUP or body.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship

    Mod: Comments about Frasier and/or Amereican Airlines are hereby prohibited.

  72. Getting back to the original blog entry for a moment,

    Blog said, “herb wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) which – along with other herbs – causes the green colour of this famous drink.”
    Not generally. In proper absinthe Grand wormwood is only distilled and never added to the coloring ingredients, this would cause the drink to become horribly bitter. This is sometimes done in czech (bohemian style) absinthe giving it a bad bitter taste. The intense green in the majority of absinth/e (both czech and other countries) is created by adding food coloring.

  73. DrAbsinthe, if you responded to questions/comments (as you said you would) without attacking other people, I’m pretty sure you wont be censored.

  74. B. - Formerly anonymous

    Funny, as Drab was the one who suggested this forum to continue our conversation.

  75. “this would cause the drink to become horribly bitter”

    Sounds like a matter of taste to me? “Horribly” That’s objective, is it? Why do the Belle Epoque writers celebrate the colour? How old are you, Ari?

  76. B. - Formerly anonymous

    “That’s objective, is it?”

    In some cases yes, but in this case, not really.

    Wormwood is one of the most bitter substances known to man. Ari isn’t saying that it would taste ‘gross’, what Ari IS saying is that it would become bitter beyond what any normal person would be able to ingest.

  77. Dear All!
    Greetings! Bonjour a tous!
    Sorry for my long silence as I have been away for a week to Okinawa!
    Absintheur, I presume, initiated this blog to share his love of a drink called Absinthe.
    As we all know, the original drink created in France, my home country, had to be prohibited by the French government because of its obvious nefarious effects (dementia and eventually death). Subsequently, the French government authorized the use of the name under strict directives. As you all know, no alcoholic susbstanve can be brewed/distilled and sold without the French government’s approval. This goes as far as the label and whatever is written on it.
    Now we all have to accept (that is if anyone is not foolish enough to risk prison by distilling it the old way to prove his/her point) that “real” absinthe does not exist and that none of us has tased it!
    I think it is great fun to try and imagine/find out what it was, and we should keep it to the fun and the fun only. If you do not agree, it might be better to create a new blog where you can transfer yor comments above.
    I will continue reading and enjoying reading and commenting Absintheur’s blog. Period.
    I will not bother with the rest!
    A votre sante a tous!
    To all and your good health!
    Robert-Gilles

  78. Drab said, “Sounds like a matter of taste to me?”
    Yes it is, although I’ve found very few people who claim to like the bitterness from macerated Grand wormwood. This is why many vodka-soak recipes call for heavy amounts of sugar or other additives to attempt to mask the taste. Of note I enjoy some bitterness and drink most of my absinthe without sugar.

    A more bitter flavor would fit with bohemian style absinth being a wormwood bitters and not absinthe

    Drab said, “Why do the Belle Epoque writers celebrate the colour?”
    Because it’s a very nice color. When properly produced absinthe can have a nice natural green that adds to the flavor instead of damaging it.

  79. A breath of fresh morning air from Shizuoka!

    Most welcome in this hot house! If you do not know Robert-Gilles is a renowned expert on Shizuoka Prefecture Sake! I doubt that any of us have tried it. I know Alan is a bit of a globe trotter, and he may be the exception. Alongside all these pre-ban absinthes I suggest we invite Robert-Gilles to offer a Shizuokasa Sake!

    Maybe I’ll switch full time after today:

    http://shizuokasake.wordpress.com/

  80. Hi again, Robert-Gilles!

    Re. “As we all know, the original drink created in France, my home country, had to be prohibited by the French government because of its obvious nefarious effects (dementia and eventually death).

    Now we all have to accept (that is if anyone is not foolish enough to risk prison by distilling it the old way to prove his/her point) that “real” absinthe does not exist and that none of us has tased it!”

    I think that several of us will disagree with you.

    1. There was a powerful anti-absinthe lobby once the phylloxera problem had been resolved (late 19th century/early 20th century). The wine companies wanted their market back.

    2. The problem was not real absinthe, but the fact that there was so much unregulated back street production to meet demand that there were what we would call Q.C. issues. If someone made sake in a zinc bath in Japan now, it might be dangerous. In short, real absinthe distilled properly was not nefarious.

    3. Many of us have tasted real absinthe, either from the remaining supplies of pre-1915 bottles and/or from one of today’s recreations. If those are made to the type of standards specified by Duplais (see above), it seems to me (and many others) that they can be considered real absinthe. Unfortunately many (or probably most) Czech products do not meet these standards.

    See the Wikipedia article on absinthe for more information.

    The good news for you is that you can get some of these real absinthes in Japan (although mainly in Tokyo).

    I would definitely recommend that you join the Wormwood Society. We’d enjoy learning about sake and you might soon be a convert to real absinthe.

  81. DrAbsinthe, since you clearly feel passionately about the issues involved here, come to http://www.feeeverte.net and debate them. I’ll moderate the discussion, keep things civil and give you every chance to put forward your viewpoint.

    Let me make a few quick comments in the interim:

    Absinthe can be made by direct distillation of herbs in alcohol. It can also be made by mixing distilled essences of herbs in alcohol. Both methods were widely used in the Belle Epoque, and both are equally entitled to the name absinthe. At the time however it was universally recognised that the former method produced a superior absinthe to the later. Directly distilled absinthes sold for a higher price, oil mixes sold for a generally lower price.

    The situation today is the same. Even the best oil mixes – Doubs and La Fee for example – are less perfumed, less complex and less satisfying to the connoisseur than their distilled equivalents. Of course absinthes produced from oil mixes have other advantages – a lower production cost, a more stable colour, less batch to batch variation, a consistent taste profile over time. This makes them attractive particularly to supermarkets and large retailers, who simply will not consider stocking a product that will fade in colour on their shelves, or vary in taste from one batch to the next – something true of pretty much all naturally coloured distilled absinthes. It’s primarily for these customers, not the online market, that products like La Fee and Doubs are manufactured.

    Why are these two products – and others like them – superior to most Czech-style oil mixes? Simple: they honestly try to achieve the taste of traditional absinthe. Most Czech-style absinthes don’t. Most contain little or no anise and most have an overwhelming bitter wormwood taste. Neither of these things are historically characteristic of absinthe at any quality level.

    Even more damagingly though, many Czech absinthes are made by simple herbal maceration and subsequent filtration, with no distillation at all. Anyone he thinks that filtration on it’s own can achieve the same thing as distillation is, to put it charitably, misguided. This is a matter of chemistry and of fact, not of opinion. This method was NEVER used in the Belle Epoque for absinthe of any quality level. Just as the manufacture of traditional French absinthe was influenced by and arose out of the manufacture of anisette, so quite clearly do these macerated Czech-style products arise out of the local tradition of herbal bitters, which have always been made without further distillation. As Alan correctly points out, these should certainly be called wormwood bitters, rather than absinthe. There is understandable resentment at what’s perceived as the hijacking of a legendary name that denotes a very specific product to sell another product made in an entirely different way, and which tastes nothing like the original.

    As for my own involvement in Doubs: I was involved – 5 years ago – in the initial formulation of the product. I’m involved currently in the online sales of the product, as part of a portfolio that includes many other products, including Jade, Duplais etc. I was not involved in any shape or form with the choice of name for the product, with the design of the packaging and ancilliary promotional material, nor with the design of the Doubs website. I have however voiced my opinions on the appropriateness of this material to the company behind Doubs. They have listened, and in the course of this year you can expect to see some significant changes.

    Regarding the so-called bad mouthing of the Czech absinthe industry: much of this originates from Czechoslovakia itself. Read the Absinth Olivia website. Email Kyle and ask him what he thinks about his fellow producers. I’m in direct contact with several Czech producers, and they have, over the years, repeatedly accused their local opposition of fraudulent and in some case even criminal activity. Add to this some plainly indefensible marketing of the KOSG/Ultimate Panty Remover type, and it’s hard to argue that any “bad-mouthing” isn’t richly deserved.

    There are small but encouraging signs that some Czech producers are moving beyond ersatz products and bogus marketing – Olivia comes immediately to mind – and at the Fee Verte forum at least I’ve gone out of my way to encourage and applaud this.

    Anyway, I’ve gone on too long here. Have the courage of your convictions DrAbsinthe. Come to Fee Verte and present your case.

  82. Very well put, Oxygenee. Thank you.

    Elliot, I do understand your desire to develop your market as you wish. I apologize for my peevishness which is spurred by the inaccessibility of your site and product. I would be very interested in learning more in private. How can I contact you? Without access to your website I don’t know how to procede. Thank you.

  83. “I’m involved currently in the online sales of the product”

    Are you a businessman or an historian? I have often seen you styled as an historian.

  84. B. - Formerly anonymous

    I would definitely consider him both. Have you taken the time to check his site?

    And what’s your response to your previously cited study?

    “As we all know, the original drink created in France, my home country, had to be prohibited by the French government because of its obvious nefarious effects (dementia and eventually death).”

    The ‘nefarious effects were due to unscrupulous purveyors of low quality absinthe who were putting unacceptable additives into their absinthe to lower production costs.

    “Now we all have to accept that “real” absinthe does not exist and that none of us has tased it!”

    So, you’re saying then that the pre-ban absinthe that I have drank is NOT ‘real’ absinthe? I would disagree.

    What about those distillers, such as TB and several others, who use the original recipes, equipment, techniques, and ingredients? You wouldn’t consider that ‘real’ abisnthe either?

    I presume you know A LOT about sake. In fact, I’d love to talk to you, and learn more about it. I’ve had hundreds of types of sakes, but I’m not sure if I’ve tried any from that prefecture. Just recently I enjoyed some competition sake from Yoshio Koizumi.

    Regardless, it seems that you are uninformed regarding absinthe. No offense intended. I recommend you check out Fee Verte or Wormwood Society to further education yourself.

    Cheers!

  85. Talking of absinthe historians:

    “Purists like the Neuchatel absinthe historian Pierre-André Delachaux rail against the “new” absinthe produced by Yves Kübler as on legal grounds it is only 45 per cent proof: thus robbing the green fairy of her soul”

  86. B. - Formerly anonymous

    Kubler is by far not a top shelf absinthe. It’s not horrible, but it’s not great either.

  87. DrAbsinthe: I’m a businessman, and an historian. The original historical research that has gone into the Virtual Absinthe Museum should be self evident. I’m writing a book on absinthe – particularly focussed on the campaign for its prohibition – that will be published late next year in the UK and France. On the business size, I’m involved in the production, distribution and sale of absinthe, and the sale of absinthe art and accoutrements, both modern and antique. Or “trinkets” as you refer to them.

    You seem to subscribe to the view that commercial involvement in the absinthe business somehow should disqualify one from commenting on it. If you applied this principle to the wine business, or to any other aspect of the spirits business, you’d be laughed out of town. You’ve offered your views on absinthe distillation. I’ve offered mine. Mine are backed up by a decade of research, access to the largest library of original source material in existence, constant interaction with almost every leading producer in France and Switzerland, and the experience of actually personally making the stuff on a large commercial scale. What are yours based on?

  88. B. - Formerly anonymous

    *applause for Oxy*

    Oh, and I’m excited to read the book! I plan on buying several copies!

  89. DrAbsinthe said:

    “Talking of absinthe historians:
    “Purists like the Neuchatel absinthe historian Pierre-André Delachaux rail against the “new” absinthe produced by Yves Kübler as on legal grounds it is only 45 per cent proof: thus robbing the green fairy of her soul”

    Pierre-Andre is the godfather of the modern Swiss absinthe revival. He’s written numerous scholarly papers on the history of absinthe in the Val de Travers, as well as several more popular books. He knows more about the origins of absinthe in Switzerland than anyone else alive.

    So what’s your point?

  90. “I would definitely consider him both”

    Two hats? That’s nice.

    Both Oxy and Alan Moss criticise the use of “thujone marketing”, don’t they? That’s one of the main gripes against some absinth. I think that Oxy also owns thujone.info?

    Anyway:-

    1. Alan, when Marketing Manager at BBH said the following:

    “French and Swiss absinthes are very different than Czech and other eastern European absinthes,” Moss said. “The main criteria of what makes absinthe is the presence of wormwood and that’s in Hill’s.”

    Source: Bloomberg

    It seems he is capable of what I have labeled “portbale truth” depending on what he is selling.

    2. Oxy sells a very small handful of absinthes via his many websites ( which nearly all have a commercial aspect) Alongside absinthe he also sells second hand pots, bar paraphenalia, posters, postcards etcetera. One of this handful of absinthes that he has chosen is from South Africa – his country of origin.

    Here is a Doubs absinthe promotion: “Doubs Premium Absinthe contains just under 10mg/l of thujone, the maximum permissible level, and the same (or slightly higher) as that found in pre-ban Pernod Fils and other famous brands of the Belle Epoque”

    That sounds like “thujone marketing” to me!

    Also this promotional email raises another question:

    —————

    Dear Sir / Madam,

    You previously enquired about Doubs Premium Absinthe, but unfortunately at the time we did not have an online ordering facility in place. I am very pleased to inform you that we now have this facility in place via one of the most respected and independent absinthe associations in Europe, namely Absinthe Classics. This association has carefully selected only 2 absinthes in the world for online sales, and Doubs Premium Absinthe is one of them.

    Doubs Premium Absinthe is fast becoming recognized as one of the finest absinthes in the world, and the highly respected Fee Verte Buyers Guide consistently rates it on top.

    Should you wish to purchase a bottle, please log onto our website
    (www.doubsabsinthe.com) and click on the “online ordering” button.

    Thanks for your interest.

    ——————-

    I draw your attention to the words: “one of the most respected and independent absinthe associations in Europe” It’s a corporation isn’t it? arranged under English law?

    Even more alarming:

    “the highly respected Fee Verte Buyers Guide consistently rates it on top”

    Indeed. I understand that Oxy bought that website from a gentleman in New Orleans?

    If Oxy removes Doubs from this very small number of brands offered, then the cynics amongst us might listen to his criticism of “thujone marketing” with an open mind. Until that time we must view such opinions in another way altogether.

  91. What kind of absinthe did they use to sell in the Cat and Mouse Bar near Cape Town? Wasn’t Czech was it? Can’t have been Swiss, so just wondering if Doubs was around then?

  92. What nonsense. I’ve never criticized the mention of thujone in absinthe marketing: it’s an integral part of the history of the product, and it’s a subject about which potential absinthe drinkers almost always have questions. Not to answer them, or not to deal with the subject is to ignore the elephant in the room. I’ve repeatedly gone out of my way to make exactly this point at Fee Verte, and a set up the http://www.thujone.info site precisely to put all the original scientific research on the subject into the public domain.

    But what I have criticized is INACCURATE thujone marketing, as practised by most Czechsinthe producers: claims that it is an hallucinogenic, that it is an aphrodisiac, that it will make you trip. It won’t do any of these things – in fact, there’s no evidence, that at the concentrations found in commercial absinthe, it’ll do anything significant at all. Such reactions as have been reported are highly subjective, unverifiable, and quite possibly simply due to the placebo effect. So to make thujone the centrepiece of your marketing – as Czechsinthe producers routinely do – is to mislead the consumer.

    As for your other points:

    Yes, thank you for posting it in full a second time, that is an odd email you got from Doubs. I’ve no idea why they described Absinthe Classics that way. My guess is that it’s a clerical mistake – they cut and pasted the response from two different press releases, one about Absinthe Classics, and one about the International Wine and Spirit Competition, which certainly is an independent organisation and which awarded Doubs a silver medal last year. I’ll ask them.

    Thank you also for pointing out for I think the 5th time that I’m South African. Yes, I used to live in SA. Three years ago I moved permanently to the UK. I spend much of time in France. My father was Latvian. My brother lives in New York. I have cousins in Australia. Any other family history you’d like to know, just ask.

    As for the Fee Verte site, no I didn’t buy it from a gentleman, not even one from New Orleans. And the Buyers Guide is edited by a friend in Sweden. Prior to that it was edited by a gentleman in Arkansas. The number of reviews I’ve edited – in total, since its inception, is zero.

  93. “DrAbsinthe // Mar 15th 2007 at 1:48 pm

    What kind of absinthe did they use to sell in the Cat and Mouse Bar near Cape Town? Wasn’t Czech was it? Can’t have been Swiss, so just wondering if Doubs was around then?”

    It was the Cat and Moose Bar. We had a stuffed moose in the room. We served absinthe from 1997 onwards. Initially Segarra, Serpis, La Fee and clandestine La Bleue. Later Jade and Doubs. Frankly, it was more absinthe than the market was ready for. We also had upwards of 300 single malt whiskies…sorry, I’ve lost track of my thoughts, what was your point again?

  94. I don’t sell absinthe, I have argued against both Alan and Oxy at one time or another (I’ve argued against you as well in the tribe ‘debate’ you left), I consider thujone marketing bad, might you listen to the criticism now, or is there some excuse?

    (Keep in mind real or imagined hypocrisy has no effect on accuracy in other words say someone who is abusing drugs says “drug abuse is bad, don’t do it.” just because they are a hypocrite doesn’t make their statement false.)

  95. B. - Formerly anonymous

    ‘Doctor’, I find it interesting that, in the face of overwhelming evidence and fact, that you choose to ‘nitpick’ at smaller arguments, and also choose to not answer the more important questions.

    As for the buyers guide, check where Dubbs ranks compared to other brands. Oxy has been unbiased regarding Fee Verte and the buyers guide. He doesn’t censor people, whatever their opinions on Dubbs or any other product.

    If you feel that Fee Verte isn’t reliable, feel free to drop in on the Wormwood Society.

    Disclosing the levels of thujone in order to show that it is within protocol is different than what most Czech sites say, such as: “It is recommended to drink it in small doses for its well known hallucinogenic effects and ecstasy.”

    THAT, my friend, is thujone marketing.

  96. B. - Formerly anonymous

    By the way, that quote came directly from http://www.czechabsinth.com, if you were wondering.

  97. B. - Formerly anonymous

    damn lack of editing… http://www.czechabsinth.com

  98. Absintheur, can you get rid of the new ad hominem attacks, please.

    Back to another unanswered question or I think it was going to be a joke from drabsinthe:

    “BTW Alan, why should La Fee not market a Bohemian absinth?” I don’t know. What’s the punchline?

    Would drabsinthe do us the courtesy of telling us a bit more about himself? Ditto absintheur if possible?

    We’ve had Oxy’s family background and some of the low spots of my career before I saw the light.

    Frankly I am worried that drabsinthe’s five South Africa references are indicative of … the “r” word. I don’t raise that at all as an ad hominem issue, but I really don’t see why drabsinthe continually brings up our backgrounds.

  99. I certainly see why he brings it up Alan. DrAbsinthe has no real arguments, and no ability to defend his postions, so he resorts to desperate measures, like the knight in the Python sketch who, having had both his arms and legs chopped off, screams “C’mon cowards, I’ll bleed on you” at his bemused opponents.

  100. Elliot Novak wrote:
    “One thing to note is that I have read many pre-ban articles about absinthe that talked about bootleg or fake absinthe being made and sold. Almost all of them stated that even though people knew it was fake (based on the low price I assume), they actually preferred the taste, or said it was as good at the real thing.”

    I’m interested in this. I’ve seen many references references to faked or adulterated absinthe in the pre-ban era, but I can’t recall any (let alone “almost all of them” that state the anyone preferred the taste, or that it was “as good as the real thing”.

  101. “before I saw the light”

    A conversion on the road to Damascus? How very convenient! When did that happen exactly? Before or after you were employed to market Swiss absinthe?

    The email, which is publised by WS, also says

    “This association has carefully selected only 2 absinthes in the world for online sales, and Doubs Premium Absinthe is one of them”

    If this was yet ANOTHER error then it is a catalogue of cock ups, isn’t it? If it is true it begs the question why your “association” (corporation) didn’t choose one of the Spanish brands? Was this a commercial decision, perhaps?

  102. Quote from Mary Poppins:

    “before I saw the light”

    A conversion on the road to Damascus? How very convenient! When did that happen exactly? Before or after you were employed to market Swiss absinthe?

    Yawn.

  103. This discussion has run its course, and the inability to edit typos etc makes posting here frustrating. I’ve opened a thread at Fee Verte if you have the courage of your convictions, and would like to join us there, DrAbsinthe.

  104. Name : Czech Absinth or The real Czech Absinth Strong – The registered trade mark of Czech Absinthe s.r.o distillery? = 6Y my favorite !Have a nice day…:-)))

  105. B. - Formerly anonymous

    This is solely my opinion Jeff, but Czech Absinthe Strong is horrid stuff. It tastes nothing like real absinthe.

    It also employs deceptive marketing by stating that it is hallucinogenic.

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